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Stay Hydrated: Why drinking water is great and how to increase your water intake

There’s a chemical compound that is taking the world by storm: hydrogen dioxide. it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless. It takes up space in the human body and occupies our oceans. Believe it or not, we need it to survive. So what exactly is hydrogen dioxide? Well, it’s water.

While water is a well-known necessity, not many people are aware of the multiple benefits of drinking water on a daily basis. According to Harvard Medical, drinking water can have a number of benefits to a person’s overall health; it can also help with specific ailments like stabilizing blood pressure, regulating body temperature, and preventing constipation.

In recent years, water has not only been found to be a great physical health benefit but a mental health benefit as well. A French study done in 2014 found that increasing water intake helped with the mental health of adults who typically were not drinking the doctor recommended four to six glasses a day.

So, how does one drink more water? Some people may not like water because of its tastelessness, it is easy to customize water to your liking. Add fruit and herbs to water to created infused and enhanced water (you can easily find fruit infused water at the Dining Commons). Popular infusion ingredients include lemon, cucumber, mint, and many others.

A great way to up your water intake is to get a reusable water bottle. I really enjoy my Swell bottle, it has lasted me all three years at EU, and money from every bottle purchased goes towards providing water to those affected by the global water crisis. Additionally, having a reusable water bottle helps save our oceans and landfills from being filled with single-use plastic bottles.

While many of us reach for coffee, soda, energy drinks, and other beverages, it is recommended that we consume water throughout our day. While water is a part of almost every beverage on the market, we can only get the full nutritional value of water from pure hydrogen dioxide.

 

Sources:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/how-much-water-should-you-drink

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24728141

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