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Philadelphia Orchestra offers reduced tickets for college students

Historically known as one of the leading orchestras in the world, the Philadelphia Orchestra is offering a reduced subscription program for local college students. For just a one-time payment of $25, students can attend any, or all, of the subscription concerts between now and June.

The program, called ezSeatU, is a spin-off of the Orchestra’s ezSeat program, which attempts to draw in more frugal customers through cheaper, general admission subscriptions. It works like this: students pay a one-time fee of $25 and then use the Orchestra’s Web site – www.philorch.org – to reserve tickets for as many concerts as they choose.

Additional tickets can also be purchased by ezSeatU members for only $8. Students check in at the ezSeatU desk on the night of the concert. They are seated approximately five minutes before the start of the show in any unoccupied seats, beginning from the front and working their way back.

In these uncertain economic times, many are unwilling to pay the typical one ticket or one concert price of anywhere between $10 and $125. Likewise, the Orchestra has not been immune to the sufferings of the recent economic downturn. The promotional program comes in the midst of an organization facing some solemn financial and organizational struggles. President and CEO James Undercofler stepped down on Jan. 14, six months prior to his previously announced departure date of July 31.

Nevertheless, the ezSeatU program is one positive outcome of the current economic crisis, as the financial struggles of many organizations have forced lower prices, offering broader access to many of the arts that were at one point out of reach for the financially disadvantaged.

In the next few months, college students have the opportunity to gain unlimited access to see the works of Debussy, Beethoven, Bartok, Schubert, Mozart and more, performed by world-class musicians for a fraction of the cost of typical adult admission.

Information from:

http://www.philly.com/inquirer/magazine/37624874.html

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